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Thursday, March 30th, 2017

Simple ways to improve your nonprofit’s cash flow

Declining donations, dues, grants or sponsorship funds may lead to not-for-profit budget deficits. But you can reduce the risk of cash flow crunches by making relatively minor changes to your cash management practices.

Expedite receipts

The sooner your organization accumulates cash, the better your cash flow. For example, consider moving your fundraising calendar ahead. By sending an appeal in July rather than November, your nonprofit may receive significant cash in late summer. Then mail reminders in November to those who haven’t yet given, and ask summer givers to make a year-end gift, too. By doing this, you’re more likely to see contributions in December as well.

Try to collect installment donations earlier, too. Instead of waiting for each payment of a four-quarter gift, contact those donors who are clearly predisposed to giving. Asking for the remaining donation in advance may speed up the process.

Get billing right

Billing errors, whether in the amounts invoiced or the recipient’s mailing address, can delay payments and hamper cash flow. Take steps to get the details right on every invoice. Request updated address or credit card information in every encounter with a payer and review reports of declined credit cards so that recurring payments can be made without delay.

Also make your invoices clear, clean and easy to understand. Use text descriptions rather than internal billing codes. The recipient should have no questions about what the charges are for or how they’re computed. Confused payers may just set their bills aside.

And consider issuing bills earlier. If a charge is incurred at the beginning of the month, but you wait until the end of the month to bill — and then allow a 30-day grace period for payment — you’re likely waiting at least two months to collect.

Manage disbursements

Managing cash outflow goes hand in hand with accelerating cash inflow. If you’re facing severe deficits, you may need to decelerate your bill payment or negotiate extended payment plans with vendors.

When your nonprofit is in a pinch, you must prioritize disbursements. But be careful: Although employee compensation can account for as much as 70% of some nonprofits’ budgets, such disbursements generally can’t be delayed.

Taking charge

Even in relatively flush economic times, nonprofits need to take a proactive approach to managing cash flow. Contact us for more cash management tips.

© 2017


Tuesday, March 28th, 2017

LiveSafe Celebrates 32 Years Recognizing Women of Achievement

LiveSafe (formerly YWCA of Northwest Georgia) had their annual tribute to celebrate women who have made extraordinary contributions to family, community, charity and their professions this past Friday night. M&J was there to support and sponsor this wonderful event. Below is one of our Partners, Aleisa Howell CPA along with other fellow supporters of LiveSafe!


Tuesday, March 28th, 2017

Victims of a disaster, fire or theft may be able to claim a casualty loss deduction

If you suffered damage to your home or personal property last year, you may be able to deduct these “casualty” losses on your 2016 federal income tax return. A casualty is a sudden, unexpected or unusual event, such as a natural disaster (hurricane, tornado, flood, earthquake, etc.), fire, accident, theft or vandalism. A casualty loss doesn’t include losses from normal wear and tear or progressive deterioration from age or termite damage.

Here are some things you should know about deducting casualty losses:

When to deduct. Generally, you must deduct a casualty loss on your return for the year it occurred. However, if you have a loss from a federally declared disaster area, you may have the option to deduct the loss on an amended return for the immediately preceding tax year.

Amount of loss. Your loss is generally the lesser of 1) your adjusted basis in the property before the casualty (typically, the amount you paid for it), or 2) the decrease in fair market value of the property as a result of the casualty. This amount must be reduced by any insurance or other reimbursement you received or expect to receive. (If the property was insured, you must have filed a timely claim for reimbursement of your loss.)

$100 rule. After you’ve figured your casualty loss on personal-use property, you must reduce that loss by $100. This reduction applies to each casualty loss event during the year. It doesn’t matter how many pieces of property are involved in an event.

10% rule. You must reduce the total of all your casualty or theft losses on personal-use property for the year by 10% of your adjusted gross income (AGI). In other words, you can deduct these losses only to the extent they exceed 10% of your AGI.

Have questions about deducting casualty losses? Contact us!

© 2017


Tuesday, March 28th, 2017

Are you smarter than a KIPPster?

M&J was a proud sponsor of the “Are You Smarter Than a KIPPster” game show event held last Thursday night. This event raises funds to support KIPP Metro Atlanta Schools. Pictured below is M&J’s Katie Smith, Aleisa Howell, Troy Wright (with KIPP) and Brandon Smith.


Monday, March 27th, 2017

M&J at CBA’s Semi-Annual Clay Shoot!

M&J was a proud sponsor of the Community Bankers Association of GA Clay Shoot this past Thursday in Albany GA. Rob Douglas shot with Lee Clark and Haynes Standard of First State Bank of Wrens. They couldn’t quite hang with the sure-shots out there, but they had a great time!


Thursday, March 23rd, 2017

Nonprofits and their staffers can save tax with an accountable plan

Your not-for-profit can’t generally reimburse employees for business expenses tax-free just because staffers submit expense records. However, you can if you have a properly executed accountable plan. Under such a plan, reimbursement payments will be free from federal income and employment taxes for recipient employees and not subject to withholding from their paychecks. Additionally, your organization benefits because the reimbursements aren’t subject to the employer’s portion of federal employment taxes.

Follow the rules

Of course, rules and conditions apply. The IRS stipulates that all expenses covered in an accountable plan have a business connection and be “reasonable.” Additionally, an employer can’t reimburse an employee more than what he or she paid for any business expense. And the employee must account to you for his or her expenses and, if an expense allowance was provided, return any excess allowance within a reasonable time period.

An expense generally can qualify as a tax-free reimbursement if it could otherwise qualify as a business deduction for the employee. For meals and entertainment, the plan may reimburse expenses at 100% that would be deductible by the employee at only 50%.

It’s your organization’s responsibility to identify the reimbursement or expense payment and keep these amounts separate from other amounts, such as wages. The accountable plan must reimburse expenses in addition to an employee’s regular compensation. No matter how informal your nonprofit, you can’t substitute tax-free reimbursements for compensation employees otherwise would have received.

Keep good records

The IRS requires employers with accountable plans to keep good records for expenses that are reimbursed. This includes documentation of the:

  • Amount of the expense and the date,
  • Place of the travel, meal or transportation,
  • Business purpose of the expense, and
  • Business relationship of the people entertained or fed.

You also should require employees to submit receipts for any expenses of $75 or more and for all lodging, unless your nonprofit uses a per diem plan.

Put it in writing

While an accountable plan isn’t required to be in writing, formally establishing one makes it easier for your nonprofit to prove its validity to the IRS if ever challenged. Contact us for more information and help setting up an accountable plan.

© 2017


Tuesday, March 21st, 2017

Who can — and who should — take the American Opportunity credit?

If you have a child in college, you may be eligible to claim the American Opportunity credit on your 2016 income tax return. If, however, your income is too high, you won’t qualify for the credit — but your child might. There’s one potential downside: If your dependent child claims the credit, you must forgo your dependency exemption for him or her. And the child can’t take the exemption.

The limits

The maximum American Opportunity credit, per student, is $2,500 per year for the first four years of postsecondary education. It equals 100% of the first $2,000 of qualified expenses, plus 25% of the next $2,000 of such expenses.

The ability to claim the American Opportunity credit begins to phase out when modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) enters the applicable phaseout range ($160,000–$180,000 for joint filers, $80,000–$90,000 for other filers). It’s completely eliminated when MAGI exceeds the top of the range.

Running the numbers

If your American Opportunity credit is partially or fully phased out, it’s a good idea to assess whether there’d be a tax benefit for the family overall if your child claimed the credit. As noted, this would come at the price of your having to forgo your dependency exemption for the child. So it’s important to run the numbers.

Dependency exemptions are also subject to a phaseout, so you might lose the benefit of your exemption regardless of whether your child claims the credit. The 2016 adjusted gross income (AGI) thresholds for the exemption phaseout are $259,400 (singles), $285,350 (heads of households), $311,300 (married filing jointly) and $155,650 (married filing separately).

If your exemption is fully phased out, there likely is no downside to your child taking the credit. If your exemption isn’t fully phased out, compare the tax savings your child would receive from the credit with the savings you’d receive from the exemption to determine which break will provide the greater overall savings for your family.

We can help you run the numbers and can provide more information about qualifying for the American Opportunity credit.

© 2017


Wednesday, March 15th, 2017

Why nonprofits need continuity plans

Most not-for-profits are intensely focused on present needs — not the possibility that disaster will strike sometime in the distant future. Yet it’s critical that all organizations have a formal continuity plan to guide them should a natural or manmade disaster disrupt operations.

Formal plan

You likely already have many of the necessary processes in place — such as safely evacuating your office or backing up data. A continuity plan can help you organize and document existing processes and address any other issues you might have overlooked.

If your nonprofit provides basic human services (such as medical care and food) or disaster-related services, you generally need a more detailed and extensive plan so that you’ll be able to serve constituents — even without a full staff and other resources.

Assess risks

No organization can anticipate or eliminate all possible risks, but you can limit the damage of potential risks specific to your nonprofit. These vary by organization type, location and technology. So, the first step in creating a continuity plan is to identify the threats you face when it comes to your people, processes and technology.

Also assess what the damages would be if your operations were interrupted. For example, if you had an office fire, what are the possible outcomes regarding personal injury, property damage and financial losses?

Designate a lead person to oversee the creation and implementation of your continuity plan. Then assemble teams to handle different duties, such as a communications team responsible for contacting and updating staff, volunteers and other stakeholders. Other teams might focus on IT issues, decide how to preserve and retrieve critical inventory or devise evacuation procedures.

It only takes one

Keep in mind that the disaster doesn’t have to be a cataclysmic event such as a major fire or hurricane. Something as seemingly mundane as an extended power outage or virulent flu season could prevent your organization from carrying out its mission. Contact us for help assessing and addressing threats to your nonprofit’s operations.

© 2017


Tuesday, March 14th, 2017

2016 IRA contributions — it’s not too late!

Yes, there’s still time to make 2016 contributions to your IRA. The deadline for such contributions is April 18, 2017. If the contribution is deductible, it will lower your 2016 tax bill. But even if it isn’t, making a 2016 contribution is likely a good idea.

Benefits beyond a deduction

Tax-advantaged retirement plans like IRAs allow your money to grow tax-deferred — or, in the case of Roth accounts, tax-free. But annual contributions are limited by tax law, and any unused limit can’t be carried forward to make larger contributions in future years.

This means that, once the contribution deadline has passed, the tax-advantaged savings opportunity is lost forever. So it’s a good idea to use up as much of your annual limit as possible.

Contribution options

The 2016 limit for total contributions to all IRAs generally is $5,500 ($6,500 if you were age 50 or older on December 31, 2016). If you haven’t already maxed out your 2016 limit, consider making one of these types of contributions by April 18:

1. Deductible traditional. If you and your spouse don’t participate in an employer-sponsored plan such as a 401(k) — or you do but your income doesn’t exceed certain limits — the contribution is fully deductible on your 2016 tax return. Account growth is tax-deferred; distributions are subject to income tax.

2. Roth. The contribution isn’t deductible, but qualified distributions — including growth — are tax-free. Income-based limits, however, may reduce or eliminate your ability to contribute.

3. Nondeductible traditional. If your income is too high for you to fully benefit from a deductible traditional or a Roth contribution, you may benefit from a nondeductible contribution to a traditional IRA. The account can still grow tax-deferred, and when you take qualified distributions you’ll be taxed only on the growth. Alternatively, shortly after contributing, you may be able to convert the account to a Roth IRA with minimal tax liability.

Want to know which option best fits your situation? Contact us.

© 2017


Thursday, March 9th, 2017

Does your nonprofit need to register in multiple states?

If your not-for-profit solicits funds online — or uses other fundraising methods that cross state boundaries — it may need to register in multiple jurisdictions. We’ve answered some commonly asked questions.

My charity receives occasional contributions from out-of-state donors. Do I need to register with those states? Yes, but only if you’re actually asking for donations in those states. The critical activity is soliciting, not accepting, funds. Remember, email and text blasts and social media appeals are likely to be considered multistate solicitations.

That said, some nonprofits are generally exempt from registering or may need to register but aren’t required to file annually. For example, many states exempt houses of worship as well as nonprofits with total annual income under certain thresholds.

So registration rules vary by state? That’s right. A handful of states don’t require charities to register at all. The remaining ones have varying rules, income thresholds, exceptions, registration fees and fines for violations. Even the agencies that regulate charities differ by state.

How much does it cost to register? Again, this varies by state — generally ranging from $0 to $2,000.

Is there a simple way to register with every state? Unfortunately not. Most states require you to complete a general information form and submit it with your last financial statement, a list of officers and directors, a copy of your originating document and your IRS-issued tax-exempt determination letter.

First-time registrants can use a Unified Registration Statement in most states. However, even those states mandate that annual renewals and reports be submitted using individual state forms.

What are the consequences of not registering in states where my nonprofit raises funds? Your organization, officers and board members could face civil and criminal penalties. Your charity might lose its ability to solicit funds in certain states or lose its tax-exempt status with the IRS.

Do I need to tell the IRS where my nonprofit is registered? Yes; Form 990 asks you to list the states where you’re required to file a copy of your return.

Given the resources involved, you may wonder if out-of-state donations are worth the trouble. For some nonprofits, it may make sense to focus exclusively on local fundraising. Contact us and we’ll help you weigh the pros and cons.

© 2017